WHAT A SETTING!

Donington Park Farmhouse is a wonderful, historic venue. The 17th century farm and barns are surrounded by stunning rural views that lift the heart and soothe the soul.

With four 'stages' plus impromtu music in the bars you're sure to find sounds to please your ears.

As well as being entertained in fine style by wonderful musicians, you'll be quaffing at a real ale bar and sampling great food. You'll be staying at a proper campsite with well-maintained pitches, hook-ups and hard-standing, real showers and toilets and a place to do your washing up. We don't think there's a lovelier spot to camp.

Wild deer have been at Donington Park for almost a thousand years. The farm is Site of Special Scientific Interest. They’re committed to conserving the natural habitats of the park; a heritage which includes not only the deer but also very rare species of insect life which live in the park’s ancient oak trees. 

Donington Park Farmhouse works with Natural England in the preservation of the insect and tree species and are advised by the British Deer Society on the conservation of the red and fallow deer herds.

Donington Park Farmhouse holds a Green Footprints business award 2013. They are environmentally conscious in all that they do and committed to enhancing their green credentials and sustainability.

They grow their own food where they can, and source locally where they can’t. They’re dedicated to their role as stewards of the countryside and the wildlife that surrounds them. And it shows.

We think you'll love it.

ENJOY YOUR STAY AT OFF THE TRACKS

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CAMPING AREA

Because this is a permanent campsite, we’ve got proper toilets and showers, washing-up areas and drinking water.

The campsite is surrounded by trees and beautiful rural views, while still being really close to the main events. Pitch your tent on lovely mown grass that’s never used for anything else.

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FOOD & DRINK

You could be forgiven for thinking you’d stumbled across a beer fest, rather than a music one.

Also, don’t be surprised if, despite dancing the days and night away, you put on a few pounds thanks to the great food available at Off the Tracks!  

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CHILDREN'S AREA

We provide free children's activities in the Oak Room during the day on Saturday and Sunday and there’s a play area at the top of the camping field.

On Saturday there’s a children’s parade – like a massive conga – with instruments, costumes, colour, music and noise.

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ENERGY ORCHARD

Aaaaand, breathe…The Energy Orchard is a tranquil haven just off the main site to the right as you face the main venue area.

Our peaceful area is away from the main stage. All our treatments are provided by volunteers, and there may be a small charge. If no charge, you can leave a donation, and feel both refreshed and virtuous!

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GOBLIN MARKET

Bring a few extra pennies so you can treat yourself to a souvenir of your amazing time at Off The Tracks.

Something to adorn you, your home, your wardrobe, your garden – you’re bound to find something irresistible. If you like a bit of retail therapy in between music or to walk off your lovely lunch, this is the ideal place to amble.

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NEAR US

The festival is just under three miles from Castle Donington – with a supermarket, cash till, petrol station, pubs, restaurants and shops. It’s a pretty little town to mooch around, with some lovely old buildings – if you can tear yourself away from the festival. And if you fancy venturing to the bright lights of the big city, we’re about 20 minutes’ drive from Derby and 30 minutes’ drive from Nottingham.

A BIT OF HISTORY

Wild deer have been kept at Donington Park for almost a thousand years, over which time it has built up a rich history and tradition. Today it works as part of the Park Farmhouse estate, allowing them to serve their own venison all year around. 

They’re committed to conserving the natural habitats of the park; a heritage which includes not only the deer but also very rare species of insect life which live in the park’s ancient oak trees, a collection worthy of protection in their own right. They work with Natural England in the preservation of the insect and tree species and are advised by the British Deer Society on the conservation of the red and fallow deer herds. 

The road outside the Farmhouse was called The Redway, and the house was built as Redway House in the early 1600s. In about 1720 the brick barn buildings were all added as a model farm, as was the fashion in the early part of the agricultural revolution. It formed part of the Donington Estate, owned by the Hastings family, who lived at Ashby de la Zouch Castle until the civil war and then moved to Donington Hall thereafter. Donington was extensively rebuilt by the Marquis of Hastings, the first Governor General of India, in the 1790s, and at that time Wilson Lodge was altered and “gothicised” to match the other two entrance lodges to the park and the hall itself.

Wilson Lodge (the part of the hotel behind the stone wall) was a gated entrance. A bell pull was installed at the top of Walton Hill, and the gatekeeper had just enough time to pull his boots on and open the gates before a carriage approached, on its way to the hall. The Army built a new road to bypass the lodge during the second world war, and this is now the caravan site entrance. In 1988 the lodge was rebuilt entirely and also joined on to the hotel by the current owners. The front stone wall was also straightened so that the lodge could no longer serve as a point of entrance.

The Threshing Barn is entirely original, except for its doors. Those at the front have been shortened, and the rear doors have been replaced with an alcove. In the 18th century it was used as a place to preach to the local farm workers by John Wesley, who, with his brother Charles, was sponsored by Lady Selena Hastings. She also used oak from Donington to build chapels in spa towns and other fashionable centres in the somewhat flawed idea of trying to convert the wealthy to Methodism.

The farm was purchased by the Shields family in 1926 and many of the barns were converted into pigsties. An army building was added during the second world war, and this is now used for wedding breakfasts. The first wedding party was held in 1985, and in 1986 the farmhouse was converted to a four-bedroom guesthouse. The hotel has continued to develop ever since that date, with alterations being carried out over each winter period.